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Euthanasia

Its a heart-breaking thought, but putting a cat to sleep (euthanasia) is something that every cat owner may have to consider towards the end of their cats life.
MOST VETS WILL AGREE THAT ITS THE QUALITY OF HIS/HER LIFE THAT MATTERS MOST RATHER THAN THE LENGTH OF A CATS LIFE.
Unless your cat has been involved in a serious accident you will probably have time to think through your options.  Speak with family and your vet about the kindest thing for your cat.  When a terminal condition is diagnosed then there will be medication to extend your cats life until that heat-breaking decision needs to be taken.  However, if your cat is suffering from extreme pain which is difficult to control, your vet may suggest that euthanasia is the kindest option.  You can then discus with your vet for the right time to book your cat in to PTS for your cat to die in peace and dignity which can also be a relief for your cat.

Euthanasia is usually quick, very straightforward and most importantly, painless.  If your cat is distressed or upset your vet may consider a mild sedative before giving a large overdose of an agent that will simply cause the cat to lose consciousness and pass away quickly.  Although this is usually by intravenous injection using a vein in a front leg, it can also be via the kidneys or heart.  Much depends on the condition of the individual animal.
Unconsciousness and death usually occurs within seconds.  Although some cats may gasp, exhale, or twitch involuntarily, this isn't a sign of life.

Its the owners choice whether of not they stay with their pet for the procedure - its important not to feel guilty if its too distressing for you.  If you choose to stay with your pet its important to not get too upset as this may be picked up by your pet.
I found this to be a special time when i spent the last few minutes with my much loved cat, measuring him that he will be free of pain soon, and that my love for him will always be with me.

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